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Why Does My Cat Drool When He Purrs?

If you have a cat, you probably know that purring is one of the ways they express their happiness and satisfaction. But have you ever noticed your cat drooling when they purr? Is this normal or something to be worried about?

In this blog post, we will explore the reasons why cats drool when they purr and how to tell if it is a sign of joy or distress. We will also give you some tips on how to deal with cat drooling when purring and when to seek veterinary help.

Cat drooling when purring can have different causes, depending on the context and the individual cat. Some cats may drool because they are so relaxed and content that their mouth muscles loosen up and saliva leaks out. Others may drool because they are stressed or in pain and purr as a way of soothing themselves. And some cats may drool because they have dental problems that affect their oral health and comfort.

To understand why your cat is drooling when they purr, you need to observe their behavior and body language carefully. You also need to check their mouth for any signs of injury, infection, or foreign objects. By doing so, you can determine if your cat is drooling because they are happy or because they need your help.

Read on to learn more about why cats drool when they purr and what you can do about it.

Why Cats Drool When They Purr: 3 Common Reasons

Cats are mysterious creatures that often communicate in subtle ways. Purring and drooling are two of the most common behaviors that cats exhibit, but they can have different meanings depending on the situation. Here are three common reasons why cats drool when they purr and how to tell them apart.

  • Contentment: One of the most likely reasons why your cat is drooling and purring at the same time is that they are extremely happy and relaxed. Drooling and purring are both signs of pleasure and satisfaction in cats. When your cat is feeling content, their mouth muscles may loosen up and allow saliva to leak out. This is not a sign of illness or discomfort, but rather a sign of trust and affection. Some situations when your cat may drool and purr because they are content are when they are being petted, kneading, or sleeping. You can tell that your cat is happy by their relaxed body language, head nudging, and eye blinking.
  • Stress: Another possible reason why your cat is drooling and purring at the same time is that they are stressed or in pain. Purring is not only a sign of happiness, but also a way of soothing themselves and relieving pain. Cats may purr when they are in distress or discomfort to calm themselves down and cope with the situation. Drooling may also occur when cats are stressed or in pain, as their saliva production may increase or their mouth may open involuntarily. Some situations when your cat may drool and purr because they are stressed are when they visit the vet, have visitors over, or experience changes in their environment. You can tell that your cat is stressed by their tense body language, hiding, or aggression.
  • Dental Disease: A third possible reason why your cat is drooling and purring at the same time is that they have dental problems that affect their oral health and comfort. Drooling and purring can both be signs of dental issues in cats, such as tooth decay, gum disease, oral infections, or foreign objects in the mouth. These issues can cause pain, inflammation, or difficulty swallowing in your cat, which may trigger drooling and purring as a response. Some signs that your cat has dental problems are bad breath, bleeding gums, difficulty eating, or pawing at their mouth.

As you can see, cat drooling when purring can have different causes depending on the context and the individual cat. By observing your cat’s behavior and body language carefully, you can determine if they are drooling because they are happy or because they need your help. In the next section, we will give you some tips on how to deal with cat drooling when purring and when to seek veterinary help.

Excessive drooling in cats can be a sign of an underlying health issue, so it's important to monitor your cat's drooling behavior and contact your veterinarian if you notice any changes. Some potential health issues related to excessive drooling in cats include:

  1. Dental problems: Dental issues such as tooth decay, gum disease, and oral infections can cause pain, discomfort, and inflammation, leading to excessive drooling in cats.
  2. Mouth injuries: Cats can injure their mouths by biting or chewing on objects, fighting with other cats, or experiencing trauma. Mouth injuries can cause pain, swelling, and infection, leading to excessive drooling.
  3. Nausea and gastrointestinal problems: Nausea and gastrointestinal problems such as stomach ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease, and pancreatitis can cause cats to drool excessively.
  4. Poisoning: Ingesting toxic substances such as plants, medications, or household chemicals can cause cats to drool excessively as a symptom of poisoning.
  5. Neurological disorders: Neurological disorders such as seizures, brain tumors, and nerve damage can affect the cat's ability to control their salivary glands, leading to excessive drooling.

If your cat is drooling excessively, it's important to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Your veterinarian can perform a physical examination, run diagnostic tests, and recommend appropriate treatment based on the underlying cause of your cat's excessive drooling.

When Is Drooling Normal?

Drooling is normal for cats in certain situations, and it's important for cat owners to be able to distinguish between normal and abnormal drooling.

Here are some situations where drooling is considered normal for cats:

  1. Contentment: Some cats may drool a little bit when they are feeling relaxed, comfortable, or happy. This is usually nothing to worry about and is considered a normal behavior.
  2. Grooming: Cats may also drool when they are grooming themselves, particularly when they are cleaning their faces or paws. This is a normal behavior and is usually nothing to worry about.
  3. Hunger: Cats may drool a little when they are hungry, particularly if they smell or see food. This is a normal behavior and is not usually a cause for concern.
  4. Heat regulation: Cats may drool slightly when they are trying to regulate their body temperature, particularly when they are in a warm environment. This is a normal behavior and is nothing to worry about.

If your cat is drooling in any of these situations and is otherwise healthy, there's usually no need to be concerned. However, if you notice a sudden change in your cat's drooling behavior, such as excessive drooling or drooling when your cat is not relaxed, it's important to contact your veterinarian to rule out any underlying health issues.

Tips For Managing Excessive Drooling In Cats

Managing excessive drooling in cats depends on the underlying cause of the problem. Here are some general tips that may help manage excessive drooling in cats:

  1. Regular dental care: Good dental care is important for preventing dental problems such as tooth decay and gum disease, which can cause excessive drooling in cats. Regular brushing, dental cleanings, and check-ups with your veterinarian can help keep your cat's teeth and gums healthy.
  2. Watch what your cat eats: Some cats may drool excessively due to food allergies or intolerances. It's important to monitor your cat's diet and avoid any foods that may be causing the problem.
  3. Provide plenty of water: Dehydration can cause excessive drooling in cats, so it's important to provide your cat with fresh water at all times. Consider providing a water fountain or multiple water bowls to encourage your cat to drink more.
  4. Keep your cat calm and comfortable: Stress and anxiety can cause excessive drooling in cats. Keep your cat's environment calm and comfortable, and provide plenty of hiding spots, perches, and toys to help your cat relax.
  5. Regular veterinary check-ups: Regular check-ups with your veterinarian can help detect and treat underlying health issues that may be causing excessive drooling in your cat.
  6. Treat underlying medical conditions: If your cat's excessive drooling is caused by an underlying medical condition, such as a dental problem or gastrointestinal issue, it's important to follow your veterinarian's treatment plan to manage the problem.

Remember, excessive drooling in cats can be a sign of a serious health problem, so it's important to contact your veterinarian if you notice any changes in your cat's drooling behavior.

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have learned why cats drool when they purr and how to tell if it is a sign of joy or distress. We have also learned how to deal with cat drooling when purring by preventing, observing, and treating it depending on the cause. We hope this information has been helpful and informative for you and your cat.

To end this blog post on a positive note, here are some fun facts and anecdotes about cat drooling and purring that you may find interesting and amusing:

  • Cats can purr at frequencies between 25 and 150 Hertz, which can promote healing and bone growth in themselves and other animals.
  • Cats can drool up to 3 milliliters of saliva per hour, which is equivalent to about half a teaspoon.
  • Some famous cats that are known to drool and purr are Grumpy Cat, Lil Bub, and Maru .
  • Some cat owners have reported that their cats drool and purr when they smell certain foods, such as cheese, tuna, or bacon.

We hope you have enjoyed reading this blog post as much as we have enjoyed writing it. Thank you for reading! 😊

CatsGeek.com does not intend to provide veterinary advice. We go to great lengths to help users better understand their pets; however, the content on this blog is not a substitute for veterinary guidance.